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Inside Myseum Fun for kids

Many of Myseum’s exhibits support the Show-Me-Standards educational requirements.  Many schools and school districts have educational requirements for field trips. We believe our exhibits will allow for these types of excursions. Please see the following list of exhibits that support the Missouri Show-Me-Standards.

                                                    Science

Kids Fun St. LouisProperties and principles of matter and energy
  • Magnetic Bridge – This exhibit uses two large Neodymium magnets to attract magnetic sand or steel pellets to form a moldable mound
    between the poles.  Children learn about magnetism, plus they have fun playing in the magnetic sandbox.

  • Opposing Magnets – This exhibit contains several large neodymium magnets mounted on a large dowel on a table.  The interaction of moving these magnets, clearly and dramatically demonstrates magnetic force.  This exhibit is an interactive activity, where the child will push the magnets down and they will spring upwards. 
    Museum in St. LouisMagnet Table – This exhibit contain powerful bar magnets, under a large table.  Children play with large bolts, screws, and washers to construct magnificent towers and bridges.  The properties of magnetism are discovered through this playful and fun exhibit. 
     
    Liquid Crystal Wall - A 36”x50” Liquid Crystal sheet laminated and mounted to a wall.  Children can use their body to leave colorful impressions like hand, foot, or ear prints.  They can also use the heat of a hair dryer to make different shapes.
    Crackle Tubes & Plasma Tube - Large tubes filled with various gasses with electric current running through.  These exhibits are very dramatic and exciting, especially in a darkened area.  Children can put their hands on the tubes and directly impact the direction of the dancing plasma or spark.  Most people are familiar with the old plasma balls at science centers and children’s museum
    Shadow Wall and Light Writer - The Shadow Room "freezes” movement in time against a phosphorescent wall. Imagination and physical fitness are the only limitations in this exhibit. Our shadow room will use new technology to provide a dynamic experience.  Glow pens will also be provided to doodle on the walls.



Properties and principles of force and motion

  • Pendulums - Two large pendulums, side-by-side; one is loaded with super strong Neodymium magnets and when the pendulum is moved Field Trips in ST. Louisshows a chaotic swing due to the repelling nature of the magnets.  The other is a pendulum without any magnets and will contrast the other magnetic pendulum.  This pendulum will be fitted with a glow-in-the-dark base and a blue LED light mounted in the bob and will show the smooth pendulum movement in glowing detail.

  • Falling Washers – This exhibit demonstrates gravity and friction.  Watch and listen as the washers fall down and spin...they make a really interesting sound as they're falling.  This interactive exhibit will have the child pulling the washers up and having them fall over and over again.

  • Catenary Arch – This exhibit demonstrates engineering and gravity. Children and parents work as a team to put together large foam blocks to create a 5-foot tall freestanding catenary arch.  The St. Louis Arch is a great example of a catenary arch. 
  • Magnetic Ball Wall – This exhibit also demonstrates engineering and gravity.  This popular exhibit encourages visitors to build and experiment as they direct the path of a ball down the face of a magnetic wall. Visitors learn from hands-on experience about momentum and the force of gravity.  The wall measures 16’Lx8’H.  Big fun for the whole family.

  • Dual Super Radar Slide – A slide is all about gravity, potential energy and friction.  Plus, the fun of climbing up the structure and seeing your speed as determined by radar

 

Processes (such as plate movement, water cycle, air flow) and interactions of Earth’s biosphere, atmosphere, lithosphere and hydrosphere

  • Fun things to do in St. Louis for kids
    Vertical Wind Tubes
    - The Wind Tube is a wonderful hands-on inquiry based exhibit that lets children use their imaginations to build flying
    machines.  Place the object into the wind tube and watching it fly 9 feet, up, up, and up, until the object flies out of the tube and floats ever so gently to the ground.  Then back to the design table to see what needs to be changed to speed the flight up or down. This interactive exhibit will be a favorite. 

    Air Vortex Cannon
    - Children will be able to create a vortex burst of air out of a large cylinder. They will be able to knock over a pyramid of empty cans from 10’s of feet away. Markings in feet will be on the floor so the kids can judge distance.

    Floating Balls- This exhibit demonstrate Bernoulli’s Principle by showing how lightweight balls can hover in the air in the presence of a powerful airflow.  Three airflow generators will be provided at different heights for kids of all ages.  A variety of different sized balls will show how size, shape and weight of the ball impacts flight.

 

Composition and structure of the universe and the motions of the objects within it

  • Interactive Video System – This exhibit fuses science and art together.  The Interactive Projection and Visual Display System is a stunning display for interactive entertainment. It utilizes one of the most advanced gesture recognition solutions for motion-controlled interactive video. This platform uses the whole body shadow to interact with the digital projection  
  • Digital Microscope - Magnification is up to 200X. A bin of miscellaneous items (e.g. circuit board, coins, etc.) will be available for viewing. Children and adults will be encouraged to bring in their own small items for viewing.

 

Misc. Science:

  • Faces – This exhibit allows the child to create faces by choosing individual facial features using forensics Software.  They can create the face oThings to do in STL with kidsf any person, real or fictional, from any time, present or past. With a click of a mouse, simply choose facial features from pictures on the right to add to your new face on the left. Add a nose, mouth, eyes, beard, glasses, hat, even dimples and forehead lines.  Kids can even try to recreate themselves.  A mirror will be available to help with their “self-portrait”.

  • Dino Dig – This pretend play exhibit allows children to dress up as a paleontologist, dig for fossils, study fossils and learn about dinosaurs.  They will experience the exhilaration and joy of the field work and discovery of fossils. They will also come face to face with a life size dinosaur.

 

                                                              Fine Arts

  • Musical Trash Cans - Electronic drum pads mounted into trash cans.  The sound is then amplified.   Touch-sensitive pads will activate the percussion sounds; speakers will be housed within the can to make an unusual, fun vibrating drum sound. Each pad will produce a different percussion sound.

  • Laser Harp - By breaking the path of each of the twelve beams, this laser trigger-based instrument will play 100+ instruments and sound variations that span over 20 musical genres. While most laser harps play a single note, this harp plays entire songs and breaking the laser invokes an instrument into the song.

  • Various unusual musical instruments
     
    • Amadinda – The Amadinda is derived from the Ugandan Amadinda, one of the chief musical instruments of the Baganda tribe of Things to do in St. Louissouthern Uganda.  The twelve note Amadinda "Ama" - big, "dinda" - keys) evolved from an even larger xylophone, the twenty-two keyed Akadinda; and has eventually become more common. The Ugandan instrument consists of 12 hewn logs laid out on fresh banana stems. This design allows children to stand and play, allowing greater mobility.

      Whale Drum
      - The tone is deep, rich and very resonant. Even on cement or turf, you can feel the vibration run up through your body.  The Heavy Duty Whales are made from a recycled propane tank.

      Stonaphone - This Lithopone has 3"x5" keys of a very dense, black metamorphic stone. The sound is surprisingly resonant on some of the stone and more muted on others, but they all have clear pitch following a scale in concert pitch, and with a variety of possible bases.
    • Wrenchaphone - Made from old wrenches of various shapes and sizes. The wrenches are tuned to concert pitch to the bewilderment of most people and have a surprisingly bright, clear, and resonant tone.

    • Boltophone - Made from large hex-head bolts.  The tone is surprisingly very bright, clear and resonant.
 

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